#674 Ever After: A Cinderella Story by Wendy Loggia

Ever After: A Cinderella Story by Wendy Loggia Ever After: A Cinderella Story by Wendy Loggia

Danielle is excited. She is getting a new mother and two sisters on the same day. She feels as if it’s Christmas. She does get a new mother and two new sisters, but they don’t take to Danielle right away. Her father must go away on business again, but at the end of the road, instead of the customary wave, he falls over. His last dying gesture is to his daughter Danielle.

Going forward a few years, Danielle is now treated as a servant in her own home. She reads Utopia by the fire. Her mean step-sister, Magueritte, likes to call her Cinderella. One morning, Danielle spies a man stealing her father’s horse in the orchard. She throws apples at him, but as it turns out, it’s Prince Henry. He gives her a nice sum of money to keep quiet about the whole deal. Henry is trying to escape his life. He does not want to marry someone he does not love.

Danielle has plans for the money, she is going to free one of the servants her step-mother sold. She meets the prince again and finds he has a love for Utopia. He also helps her to free Maurice, the servant. After posing as a noblewoman, Danielle meets the prince again, for a day of adventure, but Danielle’s step-mother is scheming to have Magueritte married to the prince. He must pick a new fiance by the time the royal ball comes around.

Meanwhile Leonardo DaVinci shows up and gives advice about love and life to both the prince and Danielle. There is a ball and Danielle does make it there and it turns out how everyone expects it to, of course.

What I liked

This is a book based on a movie. I’ve seen the movie, multiple times, and I like it. I like Drew Barrymore and I like fairy tales movies and fairy tale stories. If you’ve seen the movie, you’ve pretty much read this book. I like that the Cinderella is a little more self-rescuing in this version. She’s smart and she’s not just a pretty face.

What I didn’t like

How is it legal to make a person a servant in their own home? Danielle had more of a right to the estate than her step-mother did, but I guess that’s how things worked in the day. Step-people usurped things from families all the time. If Danielle’s family was noble in some manner, I think that still means that Danielle is noble, but maybe I’m wrong. I never got that about this story.

Overall

There’s not really a need to read this if you’ve seen the movie, but if you haven’t, it’s a nice Cinderella story to read.

Weigh In

Do you think Cinderella should be more independent?

Is it ever right to treat a step-child differently than other children in the home?

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