Native American Tales

The Seer who Would not See

The Seer who Would not SeeThe Seer who Would not See

Pima

Earth Maker made many people, but at a particular time, there were some people alive, along with Earth Maker’s son, Szeukha. Nearby lived a seer. One day a great eagle came to see the seer. He told the seer that there would be a great flood. The seer told the eagle that he was a liar and to leave him alone. The eagle came the first time and then three more times. Each time, the seer refused to acknowledge that a flood was coming. The eagle told the seer that he was a seer that would not see and left.

No sooner had the eagle left than there was a loud thunder-clap. Rain started to pour down and it kept pouring down. A great wall of water came and swept everything away, including the seer. The only person left alive was Szeukha. He climbed up on a mountain and went to look for the eagle. He was determined to fight the eagle that had caused this whole flood. He did find the eagle and he did fight the eagle and ultimately killed it. The fight lasted a long time because both were powerful with magic.

Szeukha found the bones of the dead people and brought them back to life. He also found a woman and child in the eagle’s house. The woman was also pregnant. Szeukha made sure they had food and sent them on their way. The woman bore a child which the Hohokam people and the Pima people descended from.

Observations

It’s another flood story; this one has a tsunami in it. Let’s think about this for a minute. The Pima live in the Arizona area, which is inland, quite a ways. You have to pass an entire state to get to Arizona from the Pacific ocean. If a tsunami had actually gotten to the Pima people, it would have been huge.

Now, on the other hand, the Pima lived near two rivers. It would not have been out of the ordinary for those rivers to flood. If there were canyons involved, water could rush down them almost like a wall of water. This tends to happen more in desert regions rather than areas where there are more trees. Don’t get me wrong, rivers can surge a bit when it rains in greener areas, but because of the way the land is shaped in the desert and the way that water is absorbed, or not absorbed, by the ground, there can be some pretty extreme flash flooding.

Themes

Alright, so who caused this flood? Is it the fault of the seer for not saying anything? The seer was told from the mouth of the eagle who was blamed for causing the flood that the flood was going to happen, but if the seer had told people, could the flood have been prevented? Could people have showed up at the eagle’s house with pitchforks, and the like, and carried out some vigilante mob justice on this eagle and prevented this flood?

The seer was the only one who knew, so in many respects, this flood was on him. People could have at least moved to higher ground had they known a flood was coming. This would have been the same as only one person knowing that Hurricane Katrina was going to hit and then telling nobody about it, which would have resulted in even more death and destruction. As it was, we have things called meteorologists who saw a hurricane coming on their radar and told people to leave, of course there were quite a few who didn’t leave.

The seer knew this flood was coming, taking away the idea of the ESP involved in this, shouldn’t he have told people? Even if he did actually have ESP, shouldn’t he still have told people? Would you have believed him? If someone came up to you and was like, “Hey, buddy, I’ve got ESP and there’s going to be a giant flood next week,” would you have packed your bags and headed for the mountains? If this same guy was like, “Hey, buddy, I’m a meteorologist and there’s going to be a flood next week,” would you have packed your bags and headed for the mountain? Does it matter who the message comes from?

It does matter where the message comes from. You can’t believe those people holding up signs on street corners downtown about the “end being nigh.” It obviously hasn’t happened yet. Now, if there were actually news broadcasts about how the Earth was going to end and we might as well just party it up because we were all going to die, then, yes, you better believe the world is going to end.

The Pima believed in the idea of seers, they may still believe in the idea of seers. A seer is someone who has an extra perception to things unseen in the world, maybe it’s ghosts, maybe it’s the future, and maybe it’s magically knowing when there is a Starbucks around, who knows. Seers were respected, so the announcement of, “Hey, a flood’s coming,” would have been listened to coming from a seer, even if we wouldn’t listen to a so-called seer today.

Going further, being a seer was kind of like having a super-power. You’re supposed to use your super-power for the good of mankind because you were given extra. If you’re a seer, you see things and tell people about them. If you’re Jesus, you turn water into wine and offer yourself as a sacrifice for mankind to be able to atone for their sins. If you’re Superman, you use your godlike powers to save people from Lex Luther. What you don’t do is hide your power away. What if Superman seamlessly blended into the world and no one ever knew that he could fly, or see through things, or save the world? What if Jesus just lived his life, quietly, never teaching anyone, and never sacrificing himself for all the Christians of the world? If you found out about either of these people, wouldn’t you be a little ticked?

You mean to tell me, that there was one man, who could have prevented XYZ, but he didn’t want to be bothered with it, so he didn’t tell anyone about it and now this whole big mess happened?

Yep, ticked.

Overall

If you see something, say something. This phrase apparently can apply to more than turning people into terrorism watchouts.

Weigh In

Seriously, how ticked would you be at this seer?

If the seer had some deep-seated psychological issues, severe depression and the like, would you feel sorry for him or would you still be ticked off at him for how things went down?

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